Teachings (past)

SM3511 Interface Design; Semester A 2017/2018.

Location: CMC Building, m7056;
Time: September 4 to December 1, 2017; Friday, 9pm to 12n; Friday, 3pm to 6pm.
Instructor: Assistant Professor Yong Ming Kow, yongmkow [at] cityu [dot] edu [dot] hk
Facebook: kowym [at] facebook [dot] com
For report submission: sm3511interfacedesign@gmail.com

See course description.

This course aims at introducing students to interface design at an entry level. Throughout the course, I will introduce a variety of user interface topics. These topics will include desktop interfaces, ergonomics, mobile interfaces, aging, accessible design, web interfaces, and theories. Generally, the early lectures introduce fundamental topics in interface design, while the later lectures introduce broader issues (e.g., organizational concerns). There is also a practical component of using principles you have learned to redesign a user interface. In the Final Presentation, students should be able to inform us the how their redesign worked better than its original design.

Deliverables:

(1) Weekly readings and reflections (individual work): A three-sentence summary of the reading of the week. Starting at week 2. To be handed up at the end of class (20%).

(2) Preliminary presentation (group work): Organize yourselves into groups of 4 or 5.

Enter your group members’ names into these Google sheets by September 29 (Friday), 2017: Morning class ; Afternoon class

Pick a technology (e.g., a mobile app, a website, or a desktop application) which you aim to improve its user interfaces. Ideally, this technology is something your group members care about and wish to improve its user experience. In your own groups, (1) perform heuristic evaluation of its interfaces, and (2) identify plausible design issues. Make use of a user interface software to create a wireframe mockup of how you believe the software should be redesigned (e.g., Balsamiq). On week 6, present both the design issues and wireframe to illustrate your ideas to the class. The class and I will grade your representation (peer review, 30%).

(3) Final presentation (group work): Base on your wireframe mock up, conduct 3-4 interviews with potential users to let them experience the new interface. Collect and analyze their feedbacks to identify further improvements to the redesigns. Base on this finding, use a user interface software (e.g., Adobe Experience Design) to create a clickable/touchable and interactive interface mockup. Present this realistic mockup to the class, and argue why you believe that this final design is an improved version over its original interface. Final presentation will be reviewed by the class (30%).

(4) Final report (group work): Submit a final report of between 1200-1500 words by December 8, 2017. In the report, document your design process and argue why you think you improved the original design (20%)

Students’ final grades will be calculated based on readings, peer review, and the reports.

Information below will be updated through the semester, so stay tune.

Lecture 1 (Sep 8): Introduction to interface design slides
Read: J. Grudin, 2012. A Moving Target: The Evolution of Human-Computer Interaction.  in J. Jacko (Ed.), Human-Computer Interaction Handbook (3rd Edition), Taylor & Francis, 2012. link Read only, no reflection

Lecture 2 (Sep 15): Principles of everyday actions slides
Read: Norman, 2002. The Design of Everyday Things. MIT Press. Ch.1-3. 

Lecture 3 (Sep 22): Design heuristics and principles slides
Reading: Nielsen and Molich, 1990. Heuristic Evaluation of User Interfaces. CHI’90. link

No class on Sep 29 – work on your group project

Optional Project Consultation on selected days between October 26 to November 16, 2017. Sign up at https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rh0C_CyCZsY2sCm8kDFdv9DolOB4XPRwHzkf_YJ4puM/edit?usp=sharing

Lecture 4 (Oct 6): Design heuristics and principles (con’t) slides
Reading: Card, Moran, and Newell, 1980. The Keystroke-level Model for User Performance Time with Interactive Systems. ACM Communications, 23, 7.  link

Lecture 5 (Oct 13): Mobile user interfaces  slides
no reading

No class on Oct 20  – work on your group project

Optional Project Consultation on selected days between October 26 to November 16, 2017. Sign up at https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rh0C_CyCZsY2sCm8kDFdv9DolOB4XPRwHzkf_YJ4puM/edit?usp=sharing

Lecture 6 (Oct 27): Preliminary presentations

Lecture 7 (Nov 3): Evaluating user interfaces: qualitative methods slides

Lecture 8 (Nov 10): Usability test and experimental approaches slides
Holzinger, Andreas, 2005. Usability Engineering Methods for Software Developers. ACM Communications, 48, 1. reading

Lecture 9 (Nov 17): Institutionalizing user experience slides
Read: Beyer and Holtzblatt, 1999. Contextual Design. Interactions, January/February 1999. link

Lecture 10 (Nov 24): Project week. Class time is converted into one-to-one consultation (one group at a time). Timing slots will be announced.

Lecture 11 (Dec 1): Final presentations

Key reference text:

Julie Jacko (ed), 2012. The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook: Fundamentals, evolving technologies, and emerging applications, 3rd ed. CRC Press.

 

SM2264 User Research; Semester B 2017.

Location: CMC Building, M7058;
Time: January 9 to April 24, 2017; Tuesday, 12n to 3pm.
Instructor: Assistant Professor Yong Ming Kow, yongmkow [at] cityu [dot] edu [dot] hk
Facebook: kowym [at] facebook [dot] com
For report submission: sm2264userresearch@gmail.com

See course description.

In each week’s class session, we will focus on weekly and selected readings from:
Elizabeth Goodman, Mike Kuniavsky, and Andrea Moed. Observing the User Experience: A Practitioner’s Guide to User Research. Waltham, MA: Morgan Kaufmann.

In addition, each student should have picked a context/technology which they will study. Students may work individually. Ideally, this context/technology is something the student care about, and has burning design questions they like to answer. After each week’s class session, each student is free to meet me in person to discuss his or her project in more details.

At the end of the course, each student will prepare a Final Report (individual report) – a 1500 words document to discuss his or her study + ONE key design recommendation. I will grade this document. Deadline for Final Report: May 1, 2017 (Monday)

Bonus activity:  HFESS Web Usability Challenge
http://www.hfess.org/event/hfess-web-usability-challenge-2017/
C
ongratulations Wong Yun Fung for your winning entry! See the results: http://www.hfess.org/usability2017

One to one consultation on April 3 and 10. Make your booking here:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1zELVzT-UaYF8mLjIZycPpc0MbYrQfrGBz9Bn3bWtp_M/edit?usp=sharing

 

SM6332 Computer Games and Society; Semester B 2017.

Location: CMC Building, M4053;
Time: January 9 to April 27, 2017; Tuesdays, 7pm to 10pm.
Instructor: Assistant Professor Yong Ming Kow, yongmkow [at] cityu [dot] edu [dot] hk
Facebook: kowym [at] facebook [dot] com
For report submission: sm6332computergames@gmail.com

See course description.

This graduate level course is structured around weekly readings, reflection of these readings, and sharing with fellow students thoughts behind these reflections. At the end of the course, students should be ready to conduct independent research (i.e., on academic and professional publications) regarding topics in computer games and society.

Deliverables:

(1) Weekly reflections: A critical analysis for every assigned reading in that particular week. Reflections will contribute 50% of your final grades.

In each of the weekly three hours session, we will focus on one to two research papers (or book chapters) on computer games and society.

Before each class, we will:
(1) Read each of these readings carefully and critically;
(2) Pick one of these readings, a paper or a book chapter, and write a reflection that is between 300 to 500 words;
(3) Print out each reflection; and bring it to class.

During a class, we will discuss one paper (or book chapter) in turn. Each student will:
(1) Take turns to tell the class what you think about the paper (e.g., strengths, weaknesses, or research gaps);
(2) Other students are given time to respond;
(3) We will go round the table until everyone has spoken;
(4) Hand in your written reflections to me at the end of the class.

(2) Final report: A research paper, between 2500 and 3000 words, summarizing and critiquing published works on a game research topic of your own choosing.

On either week 6 or 7, you will schedule an individual meeting with me to discuss a games topic you like to research on (i.e., to read relevant articles, summarize the key points, and criticize the current research work). Please sign up to meet me in this Google document. There will not be formal classes during these two weeks.

By April 28, 2017, submit your research paper, between 2500 and 3000 words, to sm6332computergames@gmail.com, in any standard WORD processor formats (e.g., .doc); no late submissions.

Students’ final grades will be calculated based on weekly reflections and the final report.

Information below will be updated through the semester, so stay tune. (Edited on January 6, 2017.)

Weekly Schedule:

Week 1 (Jan 10): Introduction to games research

Week 2 (Jan 17): Modding, cheating, and creative play
Reading 1: Kücklich, J., 2005. Precarious Playbour: Modders and the Digital Games Industry. Fibreculture Journal, 5.
Reading 2: Consalvo, M. (2007). Gaining Advantage: How Videogame Players Define and Negotiate Cheating, In Consalvo, Cheating: Gaining Advantage in Videogames. The MIT Press.

Week 3 (Jan 24): Electronic sports and competitive cultures
Reading 1: Jin, Dal Yong, 2008. Age of New Media Empires: A Critical Interpretation of the Korea Online Game Industry. Games and Culture, 3, 1.
Reading 2: Taylor, T. L. 2012. Playing for Keeps. In Taylor, Raising the Stakes: E-Sports and the Professionalization of Computer Gaming. MIT Press.

Week 4 (Jan 31): No class: Chinese New Year week

Week 5 (Feb 7): Worlds of massively multiplayer online games and virtual worlds
Reading 1: Williams, et al., 2006. From Tree House to Barracks: The Social Life of Guilds in World of Warcraft. Games and Culture, 1, 4.
Reading 2: Nardi, B., 2010. My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft. Excerpts. First Monday, 15, 7.

Week 6 (Feb 14): Individual consultations (sign up on the Google Doc, and come to my office at your designated time slot)

Week 7 (Feb 21): Individual consultations (sign up on the Google Doc, and come to my office at your designated time slot)

Week 8 (Feb 28): Examining social data
Reading 1: Emile Durkheim, 1982. What is a social fact? In The Rules of the Sociological Method, (Ed. by Steven Lukes; trans. by W.D. Halls). New York: Free Press, 1982, pp. 50-59.
Reading 2: Paul Rabinow, 1986. Representations Are Social Facts: Modernity and Post-modernity in Anthropology. In Cliifford and Marcus, Writing Culture. University of California Press.

Week 9 (Mar 7): Game industry
Reading 1: Tschang, T., 2007. Balancing the Tensions Between Rationalization and Creativity in the Video Games Industry. Organization Science, 18, 6.
Reading 2: Kelly, W., 2010. Censoring Violence in Virtual Dystopia: Issues in the Rating of Video Games in Japan and of Japanese Video Games Outside Japan,  in J. Talmadge Wright, A. Lukacs and D.G. Embrick (eds) Utopic Dreams and Apocalyptic Fantasies: Critical Approaches to Researching Video Game Play, Lexington Books, Chapter 8.

Week 10 (Mar 14): RMT and virtual economies
Reading 1: Heeks, R. 2010. Understanding “Gold Farming” and Real-Money Trading as the Intersection of Real and Virtual Economies. Journal of Virtual Worlds Research, 2, 4.
Reading 2: Nardi and Kow, 2010. Digital Imaginaries: How We Know What We (Think We) Know about Chinese Gold Farming. First Monday, 15, 6.

Week 11 (Mar 21): Games and learning
Reading 1: Sonia Livingstone (2007) DO THE MEDIA HARM CHILDREN?, Journal of Children and Media, 1:1, 5-14
Reading 2: James Paul Gee, 2003. Learning by Design: good video games as learning machines. ACM Computers in Entertainment, Vol. 1, No. 1.

Further readings:

Beach, K. (1999). Consequential Transitions: A Sociocultural Expedition Beyond Transfer in Education. Review of Research in Education, 24 .

boyd, d. (2014). It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Dewey. Experience and Education.

Fuhrer, U. (1993). Living in Our Own Footprints – and in Those of Others: Cultivation as Transaction. The Quarterly Newsletter of the Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition, 15, 1 .

Greenhow, C., Robelia, B., & Hughes, J. E. (2009). Learning, Teaching, and Scholarship in a Digital Age: Web 2.0 and Classroom Research: What path should we take now? Educational Researcher, 38 .

Hart, B., & Risley, T. R. (2003). The Early Catastrophe: The 30 Million Word Gap by Age 3. American Educator, Spring 2003 .

Ito, M., Baumer, S., Bittani, M., boyd, d., Cody, R., Herr-Stephenson, B., et al. (2009). Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Jenkins, H. (2009). Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Lemke, J., Lecusay, R., Cole, M., & Michalchik, V. (2012). Documenting and Assessing Learning in Informal and Media-Rich Environments: A Report to the MacArthur Foundation. macfound.org: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning.

Scribner, S., & Cole, M. (1973). Cognitive Consequences of Formal and Informal Education. Science, New Series, 182, 4112 .

Week 12 (Mar 28): Games user research and design
Reading 1: Salen, Katie, 2003. Rules of Play. Chapter 2: The Design Process. link
Reading 2: Nielsen, Jakob (2016). Game User Research: What’s Different? link

Week 12 (Apr 4): No class: Ching Ming Festival

Week 14 (Apr 11): Week 16 (Apr 20): Intellectual property and legal dilemmas
Reading 1: Burk, Dan, 2009. Copyright and Paratext in Computer Gaming, UC Irvine Legal Studies Research Paper Series No. 2009-22. download
Reading 2: Lessig, L. 2006. Cyberspaces. In Code 2.0. download

Week 12 (Apr 18): No class: Easter Break

References:
See readings.

Please help us complete the TLQ – thank you!

http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/tlq/

TLQ QR

We are interviewing ten students of SM3511 Interface Design about their learning experience, and also the use of peer review assessment in class. If chosen for the interview, you will receive $50 as a token of appreciation at the end of the interview. Please leave your name and phone number below if you are interested by December 3, 2016 (Saturday). Thank you for your support.

You can sign up in this online form: https://goo.gl/forms/Nx9PM5A4bj3K2MCj2

==

SM3511 Interface Design; Semester A 2016/2017.

Location: CMC Building, m7056;
Time: August 29 to November 23, 2016; Monday, 3pm to 6pm; Wednesday, 3pm to 6pm.
Instructor: Assistant Professor Yong Ming Kow, yongmkow [at] cityu [dot] edu [dot] hk
Facebook: kowym [at] facebook [dot] com
For report submission: sm3511interfacedesign@gmail.com

See course description.

This course aims at introducing students to interface design at an entry level. Throughout the course, I will introduce a variety of user interface topics. These topics will include desktop interfaces, ergonomics, mobile interfaces, aging, accessible design, web interfaces, and theories. Generally, the early lectures introduce fundamental topics in interface design, while the later lectures introduce broader issues (e.g., organizational concerns). There is also a practical component of using principles you have learned to redesign a user interface. In the Final Presentation, students should be able to inform us the how their redesign worked better than its original design.

Deliverables:

(1) Weekly readings and reflections (individual work): A three-sentence summary of the reading of the week. Starting at week 2. To be handed up at the end of class (20%).

(2) Preliminary presentation (group work): Organize yourselves into groups of 4 or 5.

Enter your group members’ names into these Google sheets by September 28 (Wednesday), 2016: Monday classWednesday class

Pick a technology (e.g., a mobile app, a website, or a desktop application) which you aim to improve its user interfaces. Ideally, this technology is something your group members care about and wish to improve its user experience. In your own groups, (1) perform heuristic evaluation of its interfaces, and (2) identify plausible design issues. Make use of a user interface software to create a wireframe mockup of how you believe the software should be redesigned (e.g., Balsamiq). On week 6, present both the design issues and wireframe to illustrate your ideas to the class. The class and I will grade your representation (peer review, 30%).

This semester only!! In real organizations, designing interfaces is harder than in imaginary classroom contexts–due to how simple changes of an interface is going to affect the whole organization. I have arranged with the SCM Production Center to allow students to interview their staffs while suggesting ways we can improve the user interface of the equipment check out process. This is a unique opportunity if your group like to take on this challenge. You are of course free to examine other interfaces. If you are keen, you can indicate Production Center in the above Google sign up sheet. If there is more than one group taking on this topic, we will need to determine who gets to conduct these interviews in order to reduce the workload of the production center staffs.

(3) Final presentation (group work): Base on your wireframe mock up, conduct 3-4 interviews with potential users to let them experience the new interface. Collect and analyze their feedbacks to identify further improvements to the redesigns. Base on this finding, use a user interface software (e.g., Adobe Experience Design) to create a clickable/touchable and interactive interface mockup. Present this realistic mockup to the class, and argue why you believe that this final design is an improved version over its original interface. Final presentation will be reviewed by the class (30%).

(4) Final report (group work): Submit a final report of between 1200-1500 words by November 25, 2016 December 3, 2016. In the report, document your design process and argue why you think you improved the original design (20%) 

Students’ final grades will be calculated based on readings, peer review, and the reports.

Information below will be updated through the semester, so stay tune.

Week # (Mon class / Wed class):…

Week 1 (Aug 29 / Aug 31): Introduction to interface design slides
Read: J. Grudin, 2012. A Moving Target: The Evolution of Human-Computer Interaction.  in J. Jacko (Ed.), Human-Computer Interaction Handbook (3rd Edition), Taylor & Francis, 2012. link Read only, no reflection

No class on Sep 5

Week 2 (Sep 12 / Sep 7): Principles of everyday actions slides
Read: Norman, 2002. The Design of Everyday Things. MIT Press. Ch.1-3. link

Week 3 (Sep 19 / Sep 14): Design heuristics and principles slides
Reading: Nielsen and Molich, 1990. Heuristic Evaluation of User Interfaces. CHI’90. link

Week 4 (Sep 26 / Sep 21): Design heuristics and principles (con’t) slides
Reading: Card, Moran, and Newell, 1980. The Keystroke-level Model for User Performance Time with Interactive Systems. ACM Communications, 23, 7. link 

Week 5 (Oct 3 / Sep 28): Mobile user interfaces slides*edited
no reading

No class on Chung Yeung Festival (Oct 10)

Week 6 (Oct 5 Oct 12 (wed), 12n, venue M6094 between Oct 4 – Oct 11): Guest lecture (online) by Jackie Chui, UX Designer, Microsoft, Inc. Redmond. Jackie is also a SCM alumnus. Jackie will present to a combined class, so the actual lecture time will be has been polled  and determined by popular vote among all students taking this class. slides video recording

Week 7 (Oct 17 / Oct 12 Oct 19): Preliminary presentations (When am I presenting? See Monday and Wednesday schedules*edited

Week 8 (Oct 24 / Oct 19 Oct 26): Evaluating user interfaces: qualitative methods slides*edited

*new Optional Project Consultation from October 31, 2016. Sign up at https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1rh0C_CyCZsY2sCm8kDFdv9DolOB4XPRwHzkf_YJ4puM/edit?usp=sharing

Week 9 (Oct 31 / Oct 26 Nov 2): Evaluating user interfaces: quantitative methods slides reading*edited

Week 10 (Nov 7 / Nov 2 Nov 9): Institutionalizing user experience slides slides *edited
Read: Beyer and Holtzblatt, 1999. Contextual Design. Interactions, January/February 1999. link

Week 11 (Nov 10 – Nov 18): Project week. Class time is converted into one-to-one consultation (one group at a time). Timing slots will be announced.

Week 12 (Nov 21 / Nov 23): Final presentations Peer-review forms Monday Wednesday

Key reference text:

Julie Jacko (ed), 2012. The Human-Computer Interaction Handbook: Fundamentals, evolving technologies, and emerging applications, 3rd ed. CRC Press.

==

SM6332 Computer Games and Society; Winter 2016.

Location: CMC Building, M4051;
Time: January 13 to April 27, 2014; Wednesday, 7pm to 10pm.
Instructor: Assistant Professor Yong Ming Kow, yongmkow [at] cityu [dot] edu [dot] hk
Facebook: kowym [at] facebook [dot] com
For report submission: sm6332computergames@gmail.com

See course description.

This graduate level course is structured around weekly readings, reflection of these readings, and sharing with fellow students thoughts behind these reflections. At the end of the course, students should be prepared to conduct independent research (i.e., on academic and professional publications) regarding topics in computer games and society.

Deliverables:

(1) Weekly reflections: A critical analysis, no less than 500 words, for every assigned reading in that particular week. Reflections will contribute 50% of your final grades.

In each of the weekly three hours session, we will focus on one two research papers (or book chapters) on computer games and society.

Before each class, we will:
(1) Read each of these readings carefully and critically;
(2) Pick one of these readings, a paper or a book chapter, and write a reflection that is no less than 500 words;
(3) Print out each reflection; and bring it to class.

During a class, we will discuss one paper (or book chapter) in turn. Each student will:
(1) Take turns to tell the class how you feel about the paper;
(2) Other students are given time to respond;
(3) We will go round the table until everyone has spoken;
(4) Hand in your written reflections to me at the end of the class.

(2) Final report: A research paper, between 2500 and 3000 words, summarizing and critiquing published works on a game research topic of your own choosing.

On either week 6 or 7, you will schedule an individual meeting with me to discuss a games topic you like to research on (i.e., to read relevant articles, summarize the key points, and criticize the current research work). Please sign up to meet me in this Google document. There will not be formal classes during these two weeks.

By April 29, 2016, submit your research paper, between 2500 and 3000 words, to sm6332computergames@gmail.com, in any standard WORD processor formats (e.g., .doc); no late submissions.

Students’ final grades will be calculated based on weekly reflections and the final report.

Information below will be updated through the semester, so stay tune. (Edited on January 11, 2016.)

Weekly Schedule:

Week 1 (Jan 13): Introduction to games research

Week 2 (Jan 20): Modding, cheating, and creative play
Reading 1: Kücklich, J., 2005. Precarious Playbour: Modders and the Digital Games Industry. Fibreculture Journal, 5. see
Reading 2: Consalvo, M. (2007). Gaining Advantage: How Videogame Players Define and Negotiate Cheating, In Consalvo, Cheating: Gaining Advantage in Videogames. The MIT Press. download

Week 3 (Jan 27): Electronic sports and competitive cultures
Reading 1: Jin, Dal Yong, 2008. Age of New Media Empires: A Critical Interpretation of the Korea Online Game Industry. Games and Culture, 3, 1. download
Reading 2: Taylor, T. L. 2012. Playing for Keeps. In Taylor, Raising the Stakes: E-Sports and the Professionalization of Computer Gaming. MIT Press. see

Week 4 (Feb 3): Worlds of massively multiplayer online games and virtual worlds
Reading 1: Williams, et al., 2006. From Tree House to Barracks: The Social Life of Guilds in World of Warcraft. Games and Culture, 1, 4. download
Reading 2: Nardi, B., 2010. My Life as a Night Elf Priest: An Anthropological Account of World of Warcraft. Excerpts. First Monday, 15, 7. download

Week 5 (Feb 10): No class: Chinese New Year week

Week 6 (Feb 17): Individual consultations (sign up on the Google Doc, and come to my office at your designated time slot)

Week 7 (Feb 24): Individual consultations (sign up on the Google Doc, and come to my office at your designated time slot)

Week 8 (Mar 2): Examining Social Data
Reading 1: Emile Durkheim, 1982. What is a social fact? In The Rules of the Sociological Method, (Ed. by Steven Lukes; trans. by W.D. Halls). New York: Free Press, 1982, pp. 50-59. download
Reading 2: Paul Rabinow, 1986. Representations Are Social Facts: Modernity and Post-modernity in Anthropology. In Cliifford and Marcus, Writing Culture. University of California Press. download

Week 9 (Mar 9): Game industry
Reading 1: Tschang, T., 2007. Balancing the Tensions Between Rationalization and Creativity in the Video Games Industry. Organization Science, 18, 6. download
Reading 2: Terranova, T. (2000). Free Labor: Producing Culture for the Digital Economy. Social Text, 18 (2). download

Week 10 (Mar 16): RMT and virtual economies
Reading 1: Heeks, R. 2010. Understanding “Gold Farming” and Real-Money Trading as the Intersection of Real and Virtual Economies. Journal of Virtual Worlds Research, 2, 4. download
Reading 2: Nardi and Kow, 2010. Digital Imaginaries: How We Know What We (Think We) Know about Chinese Gold Farming. First Monday, 15, 6. link

Week 11 (Mar 23): No class: in lieu of project consultation hours

Week 12 (Mar 30): No class: Easter break

Week 13 (Apr 6): Games and learning
Reading 1: Sonia Livingstone (2007) DO THE MEDIA HARM CHILDREN?, Journal of Children and Media, 1:1, 5-14 download
Reading 2: James Paul Gee, 2003. Learning by Design: good video games as learning machines. ACM Computers in Entertainment, Vol. 1, No. 1. download

Week 14 (Apr 13): Games user research and design
Reading 1: Herz, JC, 2002. Harnessing the Hive: How Online Games Drive Networked Innovation. Release 1.0. download
Reading 2: Kelly, W., 2010. Censoring Violence in Virtual Dystopia: Issues in the Rating of Video Games in Japan and of Japanese Video Games Outside Japan,  in J. Talmadge Wright, A. Lukacs and D.G. Embrick (eds) Utopic Dreams and Apocalyptic Fantasies: Critical Approaches to Researching Video Game Play, Lexington Books, Chapter 8. download

Week 16 (Apr 20): Intellectual property and legal dilemmas
Reading 1: Burk, Dan, 2009. Copyright and Paratext in Computer Gaming, UC Irvine Legal Studies Research Paper Series No. 2009-22. download
Reading 2: Lessig, L. 2006. Cyberspaces. In Code 2.0. download

References:

GE4102 Video Game: History, Industry, Society, and Creativity; Semester B, 2015.

Location: AC1, P4907;
Time: January 12 to April 25, 2015; Wednesday, 9am to 12n.
Instructor: Assistant Professor Yong Ming Kow, yongmkow [at] cityu [dot] edu [dot] hk
Facebook: kowym [at] facebook [dot] com
For report submission: ge4102spring2015@gmail.com

See course description.

Information below will be updated through the semester, so stay tune. (Last edited on February 12, 2015.)

By week 9, students should be divided into groups of 4 or 6, and begin to develop a tabletop RPG game campaign. Ideally, each group should comprise members with different expertise, e.g., illustration, script writing, game mechanics, modelling, and so forth. The RPG game will be based on the 2nd Edition Player’s Handbook and Dungeon Master’s Guide.

Throughout the course, I will introduce various topics of video games. These topics will inform students of areas of interest and dynamics within games research and its industry. Some of these topics include metagame, informal and connected learning, electronic sports, industry developments, and so forth.

Deliverables:

(1) Pop quiz. A time-limited, and open-book and open-Web quiz; to test students on one or more concepts that I had covered in class. Open format; open date. (10%)

(2) Assignment 1 and presentation (individual): Play a video game you had never played before for at least 4 hours. Write a 1000 to 1200 words review of the game. Prepare a 5 minutes presentation of your review; present your review to the class. I will grade the writeup (15%). The class will grade the presentation, i.e., peer-reviewed (15%). Write up is due after the presentations on March 11, 2015.

(3) Reflection (individual): You will play a table top Dungeons and Dragons Campaign game with your group members. One of your member will have to be a volunteered Dungeon Master at week 6. You will find a day of your choosing and play though at least six hours of a campaign game. Write a 1000 to 1200 words reflection of your personal experience. Bonus points will be given to reflections that can relate to scientific concepts. (15%) Write up is due on April 1, 2015.

(4) Final project and presentation (group).  Present to the class to the table top Dungeons and Dragons Campaign game that you had developed with your group members. This should include a campaign guide containing at least 1500 words and includes: backstory, playable characters, and at least one event and one encounter. Tell us why it is a basic set up for an adventure that is innovative and worth playing, e.g., new approaches in modelling, back story, game mechanics, and so forth. Here’s a sample campaign we will discuss in class. The class will review your presentation peer-review (20%). I will grade your campaign guide (20%). Campaign guide is due on April 29, 2015.

(5) Attendance and participation. Self-explanatory (5%).

For assignment 1, email them to ge4102spring2015@gmail.com, in any standard word processor formats (no pdfs), by the end of the class day; no late submissions.

Students’ final grades will be calculated based on attendance, class participation, peer review, and the reports.

Weekly Schedule:

Week 1 (Jan 14): Introduction to games research slides

Week 2 (Jan 21): Modding, cheating, and creative play slides

Week 3 (Jan 28): Electronic sports and gaming cultures slides

Week 4 (Feb 4): Worlds of massively multiplayer online games slides

Week 5 (Feb 11): Tabletop D&D, no slides

Week 6 (Feb 18): No class–Chinese New Year break

Week 7 (Feb 25): Virtual trading in game environments slides

Week 8 (Mar 4): Assignment 1 and presentations (When am I presenting? See schedule)

Week 9 (Mar 11): Assignment 1 and presentations (When am I presenting? See schedule)

Week 10 (Mar 18): Break up into groups to work on projects

Week 11 (Mar 25): Break up into groups to work on projects

Week 12 (Apr 1): Games and learning

Week 13 (Apr 8): No class–Easter break

Week 14 (Apr 15): Games user research and the industry

Week 15 (Apr 22): Final project and presentation

References:
TBD

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SM3159 Dynamic Media and Embodied Perception; Fall 2013.

Location: CMC Building, M7056;
Time: September 2 to November 30, 2013; Monday, 3pm to 5:50pm.
Instructor: Assistant Professor Yong Ming Kow, yongmkow [at] cityu [dot] edu [dot] hk
Facebook: kowym [at] facebook [dot] com
For assignment submission: sm3159fall2013@gmail.com

See course description.

Each week, students will be given a short assignment related to classwork of that week. Find your assignment for that week in the weekly schedule below. If our assignment is a write-up, email it to sm3159fall2013@gmail.com, in any standard word processor formats, by the end of the class day; no late submissions. Apart from writing assignments, assignments may also be class presentations. Students’ final grades will be calculated based on attendance, class participation, assignments, and the final report.

Information below will be updated through the semester, so stay tune. (Updated on Nov 5, 2013.)

Weekly Schedule:

Week 1 (Sept 2): Ethnography slides
No assignment for this week.
See:
Boellstorff et al., 2012. Ethnography and Virtual Worlds. Chapter 5: Participant Observation in Virtual Worlds.

Week 2: Mind and Body slides
Assignment:
Submit a 300-500 words write-up on a digital field site you like to study. The field site has to be related to and mediated by digital media. For example, gaming communities, smartphone users, and other technology-powered communities. You should be reasonably confident of interviewing at least 3 participants within 3 weeks. In the write-up, discuss: Technologies powering the field site; expertise required to engage participants; field stations you will conduct your participant observations; pertinent questions you like to answer. Your ethnographic findings will lead to and inspire your artwork creation (see week 6).
See:
John Dewey, 1934. Art as Experience. Chapter 3: Having an Experience.
Mark Johnson, 1999. The Meaning of the Body
Andy Clark, 2010. Supersizing the Mind.
Varela et al.,1993. The Embodied Mind.
Example of research-driven artist:
Bill Arning, 2006. Natascha Sadr Haghighian. In Jones (ed), Sensorium: Embodied experience, technology, and contemporary art.

Week 3: Mind and Interactions slides
Assignment:
Submit a 300-500 words write-up on progress of your participatory engagement. Describe the site and any observed activities in details. Support your description with media artifacts, e.g., photographs, video, music, token, or any other objects.
See:
Kaptelinin and Nardi, 2006. Acting with Technology. Chapter 3: Activity Theory in a Nutshell. Part 1 Part 2

Paul Dourish, 2001. Where the Action Is. Chapter 1: A History of Interactions.
Lamb and Kling, 2003. Reconceptualizing Users as Social Actors in Information Systems Research. MIS Quarterly,
Liam Bannon 1991.From Human Factors to Human Actors. Book Chapter in Greenbaum, J. & Kyng,M. (Eds.) Design at work.: Cooperative Design of Computer Systems

Week 4: Mind and Community (class cancelled due to Typhoon Usagi)
Assignment:
Submit a 300-500 words write-up on outcomes of your interviews. What have you found that is interesting? Support your claim with description of the people and interview quotes.

Sept 29, 2013: Confirmed field trip to attend http://www.hanart.com/exhibition_detail.php?id=214

(Information below is provided by Asst. Professor Zheng of School of Creative Media)

Dr. Bo Zheng (SCM faculty) is showing a socially engaged art project in Hong Kong. He worked with several Filipino domestic helper organizations in Hong Kong to create this interactive installation. You are invited to come and see this art exhibition, and also meet some FIlipino activists to learn more about their actions.

10:15  Guided Tour of the exhibition “Shamans and Dissent”
10:45  Discussion with artist Bo Zheng & activist Sol Pillas

Sol is a senior activist in the Filipino domestic helper community in Hong Kong. She has been a leader of the umbrella organization UNIFIL for 26 years.

Location: Hanart Square
2F, Mai On Industrial Building
19 Kung Yip Street
(take MTR to Kwai Hing and walk)
Phone: 2526-9019

Week 5 (September 30, 2013): Mind and Community slides
Assignment:
Assignment: Submit a 300-500 words write-up on experience of the field trip. First, relate the experience to theories you have learned from week 1 to week 4. Second, relate the experience to the artwork you are conceptualizing.
See:
Nardi and O’day, 1999. Information Ecologies: Using Technology with Heart. Chapter 7: Librarians: A Keystone Species.
Reading: Nardi et al., 2004. Why We Blog. Communications, 47, 12.
Mimi Ito, 2010. The Rewards of Non-Commercial Production.
Popovic, Vesna and Kraal, Ben J. and Kirk, Philip J (2009) Passenger experience in an airport : an activity-centred approach. In: IASDR 2009 Proceedings, 18-22 September 2009, COEX, Seoul.

Week 6 (October 7, 2013): Digital Performances
Presentation: Find an embodied media artwork. Conduct a 10 minutes presentation to tell the class about it. Why is it embodied? What do you like about it? What do you dislike about it?
See:
Steve Dixon, 2007. Digital Performance: A history of New Media in Theater, Dance, Performance Art, and Installation.
Caroline Jones, 2006. Sensorium: Embodied experience, technology, and contemporary art. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Selected section
Christiane Paul, 2002. Renderings of Digital Art. Leonardo, 35, 5, 47.

Week 7 (Oct 14): No class–Work on projects

Week 8: Project concepts proposal/critique
Presentation: Conduct a 10-15 minutes presentation of concepts of your final artwork to the class. Support these ideas of your artwork with (1) theories of embodied media and dynamic interactions, and (2) your ethnographic findings and insights. Relationships between the artwork and ethnography can be thematic, contextual, and/or social.

Week 9: Interactivity and Digital Art
Assignment: Reflect on assigned videos and readings of interactive and digital artist, and writer, Professor Nathaniel Stern, and engage in a discussion of his work with him in an online mediated space. In this format, the dialogue with Professor Stern is this week’s assignment.
See also:
Nathaniel Stern, 2013. Interactive Art and Embodiment. Chap 1, Art Philosophy. Canterbury: Gylphi.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgCPZaq6DJ0
More on Body Language (statement, videos, images): http://nathanielstern.com/artwork/body-language/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deub5AMgblk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ws2ymIITvdI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1Z7sotmK_k
http://nathanielstern.com/artwork/undertoe/http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/entertainment/176786551.html

Week 10: Designing Natural Interfaces slides
Assignment: Submit a 300-500 words write-up on progress of your artwork creation. If you are still working on your ethnography, you may discuss any new ethnographic findings and insights.
See also:
O’Neil, 2008. Interactive Media: The Semiotics of Embodied Interaction.
Dan Saffer, 2009. Designing Gestural Interfaces.
Norman, 1998. Design of Everyday Things. Chapter 1-3
Steve Krug, 2005. Don’t Make Me Think.
Nielsen Norman Group articles: http://www.nngroup.com/articles/
Rosson and Carroll, 2001. Usability Engineering: Scenario-Based Development of Human-Computer Interaction.

Week 11: Digital Cultures and Networked Society
Assignment: Submit a 300-500 words write-up on progress of your artwork creation. If you are still working on your ethnography, you may discuss any new ethnographic findings and insights.
See also:
Yochai Benkler, 2006. Wealth of Networks. Chapter 3: Peer Production and Sharing.
Richard Jenkins, 1992. Pierre Bourdieu (Key Sociologists). Chapter 4: Practice, Habitus, and Field.
Paul David,1990. The Dynamo and the Computer. The American Economic Review, 80.
Reading: Vygotsky, 1971 (translated). The Psychology of Art. Chapter 11: Art and Life.

Week 12: Final presentations mockups and peer review
Assignment: Present your near final version of Embodied Media Artwork to the class for feedback. Peer review. Solicit critiques to get ready for final presentations.

Week 13 (Nov 25): Final presentations
Assignment: Present final version of an Embodied Media Artwork to a invited panel of experts, including Asst. Professor Zheng Bo and Assoc. Professor Linda Lai. Format TBD.

December 16, 2013: Final Reports due
Submit a 2500-3000 words report discussing your artwork concepts, creation, and final details. Support these ideas of your artwork with (1) theories of embodied media and dynamic interactions, and (2) your ethnographic findings and insights. Relationships between the artwork and ethnography can be thematic, contextual, and/or social.